"to promote the sciences and strengthen their influence in society"

Science in Society

A knowledge-based society that gives priority to education, research and innovation has the best chances of meeting the future challenges. The Academy focuses on important social issues and appraises them from a scienctific perspective.

Thanks to its independent position and accumulated experience – not least internationally – the Academy is well positioned to play an important part in research-political discussion. Since the Academy comprises all scientific disciplines a very wide spectrum of issues can be reviewed, just as complex issues can be discussed from many different viewpoints.

The Academy supports the position of Chief Scientific Advisor in EU

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences addressed in September 2014 a letter to the President of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, and expressed its strong support for the position of Chief Scientific Advisor (CSA). The statement was written in response to a letter that Juncker had received from nine non-governmental organizations, including Greenpeace, urging him to abolish the position of CSA. The Academy think that “the role of the CSA, to provide independent expert advice on any aspect of science, technology and innovation, is of fundamental value for Europe and its citizens, especially with respect to the increasing influence of professional lobbyists”.

Read the full letter (pdf)

Policymakers must plan for a Europe with low fertility rates and longer lives


Foto: Deutsches Bundesarchiv, Egon Steiner Low fertility rates, an ageing population and increased migration within Europe pose significant challenges for policymakers according to a joint statement published on 10 June by eight European academies of science.

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Unexpected benefits

All too often, politicians and other decision-makers reason that strategic research initiatives focusing on predetermined areas will deliver the necessary results. With this approach, we are in danger of missing the greatest breakthroughs, which in many cases are based on discoveries in open-ended research. The Academy is alarmed by the decline of recent years in conditions for open-ended research, and strongly supports initiatives to improve its funding. Without such actions, the long-term development of society will be impaired.

In the publication Unexpected benefits, the Academy aim to highlight a few examples of how basic research, without being driven by ideas about applications, has nonetheless yielded myriad everyday benefits. History is full of unexpected discoveries that paved the way for what are now self-evident features of our everyday life, such as our IT society, healthcare and drugs that keep us healthy, or new materials with fascinating properties.

The project is funded by the Kjell and Märta Beijer Foundation, the Olle Engkvist Foundation, the Sven and Dagmar Salén Foundation, and the Wenner-Gren Foundation.  

Download Unexpected benefits (pdf)

Statement by the Academy: Sweden needs bold, creative and pioneering basic research

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has delivered a statement to the Ministry of Education and Research ahead of the forthcoming 2012 Research and Innovation Policy Bill. It emphasises that Sweden needs bold, creative and pioneering basic research in order to safeguard the country's future prosperity and tackle the huge global challenges humanity is facing. It is the Academy's view that the government should:

  • provide quality assurance for government research appropriations
  • ensure long-term coordination of Swedish research policy
  • work to strengthen basic research in Europe
  • foster academic mobility and the long-term supply of knowledge
  • invest in individual creative researchers
  • improve infrastructure
  • rehabilitate know-how in Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology.

Read the full statement (pdf)

Kungl. Vetenskapsakademien