"to promote the sciences and strengthen their influence in society"
News 2012-12-19
 

The Institute for Solar Physics transferred to Stockholm University and the Swedish Research Council

On 1 January 2013 the Institute for Solar Physics will be transferred to Stockholm University. The institute then becomes a national research infrastructure supported by the Swedish Research Council.

The Institute for Solar Physics operates the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) at the Roque de los Muchachos on the Canary Island of La Palma. It came into operation in 2002 and is currently the most highly resolving solar telescope in the world.The Institute for Solar Physics operates the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) at the Roque de los Muchachos on the Canary Island of La Palma. It came into operation in 2002 and is currently the most highly resolving solar telescope in the world.

The research is mainly aimed to gain knowledge about how the sun's magnetic fields arises, takes shape and ultimately are destroyed or removed from the solar surface. Moreover, how these magnetic fields affect the sun's outer atmosphere and cause solar storms and radiant energy emitted by the sun. During Academy member Göran Scharmer's management, the institute's research on sunspots made ​​great strides over the past decade. Two studies have been published in Nature (2002) and Science (2011).

Several of the institutes founded and operated by the Academy has over time been transferred to the state, such as the Swedish Museum of Natural History, the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) and the Abisko Scientific Research Station.

Background

The history of the Institute for Solar Physics begins in 1951, when Academy member Yngve Öhman established a research station for astrophysics on the island of Capri, Italy. Around 1980 the station moved to La Palma in the Canary Islands. The new station, inaugurated in 1985, is situated within the Spanish-International Observatory on the Roque de los Muchachos.  The Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope (SVST) was erected in 1985. After almost 15 years of successful operations the SVST was replaced with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST), currently the most highly resolving solar telescope in the world.

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